The Sagittal Angle of the Trigeminal Nerve at the Porus Trigeminus is a Radiologic Predictor of Surgical Outcome in Microvascular Decompression for Classical Trigeminal Neuralgia

Neurosurgery 94:524–528, 2024

Classical trigeminal neuralgia (cTN) is a painful disease. Microvascular decompression (MVD) provides immediate and durable relief in many patients. A variety of positive and negative prognostic biomarkers for MVD have been identified. The sagittal angle of the trigeminal nerve at the porus trigeminus (SATNaPT) is an MRI biomarker that can identify a subset of patients with cTN whose trigeminal nerve anatomy is different from normal controls. The purpose of this case-control study was to determine whether an abnormally hyperacute SATNaPT is a negative prognostic biomarker in patients with cTN undergoing MVD.

METHODS: Preoperative MRIs from 300 patients with cTN who underwent MVD were analyzed to identify patients with a hyperacute SATNaPT (defined as less than 3 SDs below the mean). The rate of surgical success (pain-free after at least 12 months) was compared between patients with a hyperacute SATNaPT and all other patients.

RESULTS: Patients without a hyperacute SATNaPT had an 82% likelihood of surgical success, whereas patients with a hyperacute SATNaPT had a 58% likelihood of surgical success (P < .05). Patients with a hyperacute SATNaPT who also had no evidence of vascular compression on preoperative MRI had an even lower likelihood of success (29%, P < .05).

CONCLUSION: In patients with cTN being considered for MVD, a hyperacute SATNaPT is a negative prognostic biomarker that predicts a higher likelihood of surgical failure. Patients with a hyperacute SATNaPT, particularly those without MRI evidence of vascular compression, may benefit from other surgical treatments or a modification of MVD to adequately address the underlying cause of cTN.

Modic Changes Increase the Cage Subsidence Rate in Spinal Interbody Fusion Surgery: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis

OBJECTIVE: To compare the effect of different Modic changes (MC) grades on the cage subsidence rate after spinal interbody fusion surgery.

METHODS: We comprehensively searched the PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases from inception to August 13, 2023, for relevant randomized controlled trials and prospective and retrospective cohort studies. Review Manager 5.3 and STATA13.0 were used to conduct this meta-analysis. The subsidence rate was assessed using relative risk and 95% confidence intervals.

RESULTS: Six studies with a total of 716 segments were allocated to four groups according to the type of MC. The subsidence rate in the non-Modic changes (NMC) was significantly lower than that in the MC. The subsidence rate in the NMC was significantly lower than that in the MC in the subgroup of cages with extra instrumentation. No significant difference was identified between the 2 groups in the oblique lumbar interbody fusion subgroup. The subsidence rate in the NMC was significantly lower than that in the MC in the transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion subgroup. The subsidence rate in the NMC was significantly lower than that in the MC1 and MC2. We found no significant difference between NMC and MC3, MC1 and MC2, MC1 and MC3, or MC2 and MC3.

CONCLUSIONS: MC may be associated with a higher cage subsidence rate. With the increase in MC grades, the incidence of subsidence decreased gradually, but it was always higher than that in the NMC. Oblique lumbar interbody fusion may be a better choice for the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease with MC.

Patient-Reported Outcomes After Focused Ultrasound Thalamotomy for Tremor-Predominant Parkinson’s Disease

Neurosurgery 93:884–891, 2023

Magnetic resonance–guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) has emerged as a precise, incisionless approach to cerebral lesioning and an alternative to neuromodulation in movement disorders. Despite rigorous clinical trials, long-term patient-centered outcome data after MRgFUS for tremor-predominant Parkinson’s Disease (TPPD) are relatively lacking.

OBJECTIVE: To report long-term data on patient satisfaction and quality of life after MRgFUS thalamotomy for TPPD.

METHODS: In a retrospective study of patients who underwent MRgFUS thalamotomy for TPPD at our institution between 2015 and 2022, a patient survey was administered to collect self-reported measures of tremor improvement, recurrence, Patients’ Global Impression of Change (PGIC), and side effects. Patient demographics, FUS parameters, and lesion characteristics were analyzed.

RESULTS: A total of 29 patients were included with a median follow-up of 16 months. Immediate tremor improvement was achieved in 96% of patients. Sustained improvement was achieved in 63% of patients at last follow-up. Complete tremor recurrence to baseline occurred for 17% of patients. Life quality improvement denoted by a PGIC of 1 to 2 was reported by 69% of patients. Long-term side effects were reported by 38% of patients and were mostly mild. Performing a secondary anteromedial lesion to target the ventralis oralis anterior/posterior nucleus was associated with higher rates of speech-related side effects (56% vs 12%), without significant improvement in tremor outcomes.

CONCLUSION: Patient satisfaction with FUS thalamotomy for tremor-predominant PD was very high, even at longer term. Extended lesioning to target the motor thalamus did not improve tremor control and may contribute to greater frequency of postoperative motor- and speech-related side effects.

Two cases of SMA syndrome after neurosurgical injury to the frontal aslant tract

Acta Neurochirurgica (2023) 165:2473–2478

Supplementarymotor area (SMA) syndrome is characterised by transient disturbance in volitional movement and speech production which classically occurs after injury to the medial premotor area.

We present two cases of SMA syndrome following isolated surgical injury to the frontal aslant tract (FAT) with the SMA intact. The first case occurred after resection of a left frontal operculum tumour. The second case occurred after a transcortical approach to a ventricular neurocytoma. The clinical picture and fMRI activation patterns during recovery were typical for SMA syndrome and support the theory that the FAT is a critical bundle in the SMA complex function.

 

Utility of MRI in surgical planning for parasagittal meningiomas

Acta Neurochirurgica (2023) 165:1717–1725

Surgical resection is the standard treatment for parasagittal meningioma (PSM), but complete resection may be challenging due to superior sagittal sinus (SSS) involvement. The SSS may be partially or completely obstructed, and collateral veins are commonly present. Thus, knowing the status of the SSS in PSM cases prior to treatment is essential to a successful outcome. MRI is utilized prior to surgery in order to determine SSS status and to check for presence of collateral veins.

The objective of this study is to evaluate the reliability of MRI in predicting both SSS involvement and presence of collateral veins in subsequent comparison to actual intra-operative findings, and to report on complications and outcomes.

Methods 27 patients were retrospectively analyzed for this study. A blinded radiologist reviewed all pre-operative images, noting SSS status and collateral vein presence. Intraoperative findings were obtained from hospital records to similarly categorize SSS status and collateral vein presence.

Results Sensitivity of the MRI to SSS status was found to be 100% and specificity was 93%. However, sensitivity and specificity of MRI to collateral vein presence was only 40% and 78.6%, respectively. Complications were experienced by 22% of patients, the majority neurologic in nature.

Conclusion MRI accurately predicted SSS occlusion status, but was less consistent in identification of collateral veins. These findings suggest MRI should be used with caution prior to PSM resection surgery particularly with regards to the presence of collateral veins which may complicate resection.

Minimally Invasive Surgery of Deep-Seated Brain Lesions Using Tubular Retractors and Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation-Based Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography Guidance: The Minefield Paradigm

Operative Neurosurgery 24:656–664, 2023

Surgical treatment of deep-seated brain lesions is a major challenge for neurosurgeons. Recently, tubular retractors have been used to help neurosurgeons in achieving the targeting and resection of deep lesions.

OBJECTIVE: To describe a novel surgical approach based on the combination of tubular retractors and preoperative mapping by navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) and nTMS-based diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography for the safe resection of deep-seated lesions.

METHODS: Ten consecutive patients affected by deep-seated brain lesions close to eloquent motor/language/visual pathways underwent preoperative nTMS mapping of motor/language cortical areas and nTMS-based DTI tractography of adjacent eloquent white matter tracts, including optic radiations. The nTMS-based information was used to plan the optimal surgical trajectory and to guide the insertion of tubular retractors within the brain parenchyma without causing injury to the eloquent cortical and subcortical structures. After surgery, all patients underwent a new nTMS-based DTI tractography of fascicles close to the tumor to verify their structural integrity.

RESULTS: Gross total resection was achieved in 8 cases, subtotal resection in 1 case, and a biopsy in 1 case. No new postoperative deficits were observed, except in 1 case where a visual field defect due to injury to the optic radiations occurred. Postoperative nTMS-based DTI tractography showed the integrity of the subcortical fascicles crossed by tubular retractors trajectory in 9 cases.

CONCLUSION: The novel strategy combining tubular retractors with functional nTMS-based preoperative mapping enables a safe microsurgical resection of deep-seated lesions through the preservation of eloquent cortical areas and subcortical fascicles, thus reducing the risk of new permanent deficits.

Fiber Density and Structural Brain Connectome in Glioblastoma Are Correlated With Glioma Cell Infiltration

Neurosurgery 92:1234–1242, 2023

Glioblastoma (GBM) preferred to infiltrate into white matter (WM) beyond the recognizable tumor margin.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether fiber density (FD) and structural brain connectome can provide meaningful information about WM destruction and glioma cell infiltration.

METHODS: GBM cases were collected based on inclusion criteria, and baseline information and preoperative MRI results were obtained. GBM lesions were automatically segmented into necrosis, contrast-enhanced tumor, and edema areas. We obtained the FD map to compute the FD and lnFD values in each subarea and reconstructed the structural brain connectome to obtain the topological metrics in each subarea. We also divided the edema area into a nonenhanced tumor (NET) area and a normal WM area based on the contralesional lnFD value in the edema area, and computed the NET ratio.

RESULTS: Twenty-five GBM cases were included in this retrospective study. The FD/lnFD value and topological metrics (aCp, aLp, aEg, aEloc, and ar) were significantly correlated with GBM subareas, which represented the extent of WM destruction and glioma cell infiltration. The FD/lnFD values and topological parameters were correlated with the NET ratio. In particular, the lnFD value in the edema area was correlated with the NET ratio (coefficient, 0.92). Therefore, a larger lnFD value indicates more severe glioma infiltration in the edema area and suggests an extended resection for better clinical outcomes.

CONCLUSION: The FD and structural brain connectome in this study provide a new insight into glioma infiltration and a different consideration of their clinical application in neurooncology.

Presence of a fundal fluid cap on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging may predict long-term facial nerve function after resection of vestibular schwannoma via the retrosigmoid approach

J Neurosurg 138:972–980, 2023

Preservation of neurological function is a priority when performing a resection of a vestibular schwannoma (VS). Few studies have examined the radiographic value of a fundal fluid cap—i.e., cerebrospinal fluid in the lateral end of a VS within the internal auditory canal—for prediction of postoperative neurological function. The aim of this study was to clarify whether the presence of a fundal fluid cap on preoperative magnetic resonance images has a clinical impact on facial nerve function after resection of VSs.

METHODS The presence of a fundal fluid cap and its prognostic impact on long-term postoperative facial nerve function were analyzed.

RESULTS A fundal fluid cap was present in 102 of 143 patients who underwent resection of sporadic VSs via the retrosigmoid approach. Facial nerve function was acceptable (House-Brackmann grade I–II) immediately after surgery in 82 (80.4%) patients with a fundal fluid cap and in 26 (63.4%) of those without this sign. The preservation rate of facial nerve function increased in a time-dependent manner after surgery in patients with a fundal fluid cap but plateaued by 3 months postoperatively in those without a fundal fluid cap; the difference was statistically significant at 12 months (96.1% vs 82.9%, p = 0.013) and 24 months (97.1% vs 82.9%, p = 0.006) after surgery. The presence of a fundal fluid cap had a significantly positive effect on long-term facial nerve function at 24 months after surgery when tumor size and intraoperative neuromonitoring response were taken into account (OR 5.55, 95% CI 1.12–27.5, p = 0.034).

CONCLUSIONS Neuromonitoring-guided microsurgery for total resection of VSs is more likely to be successful in terms of preservation of facial nerve function if a fundal fluid cap is present. This preoperative radiographic sign could be helpful when counseling patients and deciding the treatment strategy.

Radiological Differentiation Between Intracranial Meningioma and Solitary Fibrous Tumor/Hemangiopericytoma

World Neurosurg. (2023) 170:68-83

Intracranial solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is characterized by aggressive local behavior and high post-resection recurrence rates. It is difficult to distinguish between SFT and meningiomas, which are typically benign. The goal of this study was to systematically review radiological features that differentiate meningioma and SFT.

METHODS: We performed a systematic review in accordance with PRISMA guidelines to identify studies that used imaging techniques to identify radiological differentiators of SFT and meningioma.

RESULTS: Eighteen studies with 1565 patients (SFT: 662; meningiomas: 903) were included. The most commonly used imaging modality was diffusion weighted imaging, which was reported in 11 studies. Eight studies used a combination of diffusion weighted imaging and T1- and T2-weighted sequences to distinguish between SFT and meningioma. Compared to all grades/subtypes of meningioma, SFT is associated with higher apparent diffusion coefficient, presence of narrow-based dural attachments, lack of dural tail, less peritumoral brain edema, extensive serpentine flow voids, and younger age at initial diagnosis. Tumor volume was a poor differentiator of SFT and meningioma, and overall, there were less consensus findings in studies exclusively comparing angiomatous meningiomas and SFT.

CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians can differentiate SFT from meningiomas on preoperative imaging by looking for higher apparent diffusion coefficient, lack of dural tail/narrow-based dural attachment, less peritumoral brain edema, and vascular flow voids on neuroimaging, in addition to younger age at diagnosis. Distinguishing between angiomatous meningioma and SFT is much more challenging, as both are highly vascular pathologies. Tumor volume has limited utility in differentiating between SFT and various grades/subtypes of meningioma.

 

Association of Preoperative Vascular Wall Imaging Patterns and Surgical Outcomes in Patients With Unruptured Intracranial Saccular Aneurysms

Neurosurgery 92:421–430, 2023

MR vascular wall imaging (VWI) may have prognostic value in patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs).

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the value of VWI as a predictor of surgical outcome in patients with UIAs.

METHODS: This prospective cohort study evaluated surgical outcomes in consecutive patients with UIAs who underwent surgical clipping at a single center. All participants underwent high-resolution VWI and were followed for at least 6 months. The primary clinical outcome was modified Rankin scale (mRS) score 6 months after surgery.

RESULTS: The number of patients in the no wall enhancement, uniformwall enhancement (UWE), and focal wall enhancement (FWE) groups was 37, 145, and 154, respectively. Incidence of postoperative complications was 15.5% in the FWE group, 12.4% in the UWE group, and 5.4% in the no wall enhancement group. The proportion of patients with mRS score >2 at the 6-month follow-up was significantly higher in the FWE group than in the UWE group (14.3% vs 6.9%; P = .0389). In the multivariate analysis, FWE (odds ratio, 2.573; 95% CI 1.001-6.612) and positive proximal artery remodeling (odds ratio, 10.56; 95% CI 2.237-49.83) were independent predictors of mRS score >2 at the 6-month follow-up.

CONCLUSION: Preoperative VWI can improve the surgeon’s understanding of aneurysm pathological structure. Type of aneurysmal wall enhancement on VWI is associated with clinical outcome and incidence of salvage anastomosis and surgical complications.

Laser interstitial thermal therapy using the Leksell Stereotactic System and a diagnostic MRI suite

Acta Neurochirurgica (2023) 165:549–554

Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a stereotactic neurosurgical procedure used to treat neoplastic and epileptogenic lesions in the brain. A variety of advanced technological instruments such as frameless navigation systems, robotics, and intraoperative MRI are often described in this context, although the surgical procedure can also be performed using a standard stereotactic setup and a diagnostic MRI suite.

Methods We report on our experience and a surgical technique using a Leksell stereotactic frame and a diagnostic MRI suite to perform LITT.

Conclusion LITT can be safely performed using the Leksell frame and a diagnostic MRI suite, making the technique available even to neuro-oncology centers without advanced technological setup.

Pineal cyst: results of long-term MRI surveillance and analysis of growth and shrinkage rates

J Neurosurg 138:113–119, 2023

OBJECTIVE Pineal cyst (PC) is a relatively common true cyst in the pineal gland. Its long-term natural course remains ill defined. This study aims to evaluate the long-term natural history of PC and examine MRI risk factors for cyst growth and shrinkage to help better define which patients might benefit from surgical intervention.

METHODS The records and MRI of 409 consecutive patients with PC were retrospectively examined (nonsurgical cohort). Cyst growth and shrinkage were defined as a ≥ 2-mm increase and decrease in cyst diameter in any direction, respectively. In addition to size, MRI signal intensity ratios were analyzed.

RESULTS The median radiological follow-up period was 10.7 years (interquartile range [IQR] 6.4–14.3 years). The median change in maximal diameter was −0.6 mm (IQR −1.5 to 1.3 mm). During the observation period, cyst growth was confirmed in 21 patients (5.1%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that only age (odds ratio [OR] 0.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93–0.99, p < 0.01) was significantly associated with cyst growth. No patient required resection during the observation period. Cyst shrinkage was confirmed in 57 patients (13.9%). Multivariate analysis revealed that maximal diameter (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.12–1.35, p < 0.01) and cyst CSF T2 signal intensity ratio (OR 9.06, 95% CI 1.38–6.62 × 101, p = 0.02) were significantly associated with cyst shrinkage.

CONCLUSIONS Only 5% of PCs, mainly in patients younger than 50 years of age, have the potential to grow, while cyst shrinkage is more likely to occur across all age groups. Younger age is associated with cyst growth, while larger diameter and higher signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging are associated with shrinkage. Surgery is rarely needed for PCs, despite the possibility of a certain degree of growth.

Adult diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma: clinical, radiological, pathological, molecular features, and treatments of 96 patients

J Neurosurg 137:1628–1638, 2022

Unlike its pediatric counterpart, adult diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) remains largely unelucidated. In this study, the authors examined the clinical, radiological, pathological, molecular, and clinical aspects of 96 adult DIPGs.

METHODS The National Brain Tumor Registry of China (April 2013–December 2019) was used to collect data on radiologically diagnosed adult DIPG patients. Survival analysis was conducted using Kaplan-Meier curves and univariate and multivariate Cox regression. The chi-square test/Wilcoxon rank-sum test and multivariable logistic regression were used to examine the clinical and radiological characteristics of patients with long-term survival (LTS). Interaction analyses between clinical factors were also conducted.

RESULTS The median age at symptom onset was 33.5 years, and the median duration of symptoms was 4.5 months. The frequencies of H3K27M and IDH1 mutations were 37.2% and 26.5%, respectively. All adult DIPG patients had a median overall survival (OS) of 19.5 months, with 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates of 67.0%, 42.8%, and 36.0%, respectively. The median OS of 40 patients who did not undergo treatment was 13.4 months. Patients with H3K27M-mutant tumors had a poorer prognosis than those with IDH-mutant tumors (p < 0.001) and H3K27M(−)/IDH–wild-type tumors (p = 0.002), with a median OS of 11.4 months. The median OSs of patients with H3K27M-mutant tumors who received treatment and those who did not were 13.8 months and 7.5 months, respectively (p = 0.016). Among patients with and without a pathological diagnosis, H3K27M mutation (p < 0.001) and contrast enhancement on MRI (p = 0.003), respectively, imparted a worse prognosis. Treatments were the predictive factor for patients with H3K27M-mutant tumors (p = 0.038), whereas contrast enhancement on MRI was the prognostic factor for the H3K27M(−) group (p = 0.038). In addition, H3K27M mutation and treatment were significant predictors for patients with symptom duration ≤ 4 months (H3K27M, p = 0.020; treatment, p = 0.014) and tumors with no contrast enhancement (H3K27M, p = 0.003; treatment, p = 0.042). Patients with LTS were less likely to have cranial nerve palsy (p = 0.002) and contrast enhancement on MRI at diagnosis (p = 0.022).

CONCLUSIONS It is recommended that all adult DIPG patients undergo genomic testing for H3K27M and IDH mutations. Despite the low prevalence, additional study is needed to better characterize the efficacy of various treatment modalities in adults with DIPG.

Wall enhancement in unruptured posterior communicating aneurysms with oculomotor nerve palsy on magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging

J Neurosurg 137:668–674, 2022

Recent MR vessel wall imaging studies of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) have revealed that aneurysm wall enhancement (AWE) can be an indicator for aneurysm evolution; however, the degree of AWE among different types of evolving UIAs has yet to be clarified. The authors assessed the degree of AWE in unruptured posterior communicating artery (PcomA) aneurysms with oculomotor nerve palsy (ONP), which may be a subgroup of evolving UIAs with rapid enlargement and high rupture risk.

METHODS The degree of AWE was analyzed in 35 consecutive evolving PcomA aneurysms (19 with and 16 without ONP). UIAs were considered to be evolving when showing growth or ONP. A 3D T1-weighted fast spin echo sequence was obtained after contrast media injection, and the contrast ratio of the aneurysm wall against the pituitary stalk (CR stalk ) was calculated as the indicator of AWE. The CR stalk in evolving UIAs with ONP was compared with that in UIAs without ONP.

RESULTS The CR stalk was significantly higher in evolving UIAs with ONP than in those without ONP (0.85 vs 0.57; p =0.006). In multivariable analysis, the CR stalk remained a significant indicator for ONP presentation in evolving UIAs (OR 6.13, 95% CI 1.21–31.06).

CONCLUSIONS AWE was stronger in evolving PcomA aneurysms with ONP than in those without ONP, suggesting the potential utility of AWE for risk stratification in evolving UIAs. The degree of AWE can be a promising indicator of a rupture-prone UIA, which can be useful information for the decision-making process in the treatment of UIAs.

The diagnostic value of contrast enhancement on MRI in diffuse and anaplastic gliomas

Acta Neurochirurgica (2022) 164:2035–2040

We evaluated differentiations in gadolinium contrast enhancement (CE) between low-grade WHO °II and high-grade WHO °III gliomas in conventional MRI, which have been repeatedly questioned.

Methods Ninety-nine patients, who underwent first resection of WHO°II and °III gliomas, were retrospectively retrieved from a prospective database. The quantitative metric volume of Gd-CE in T1-weighted pre-operative MRI was measured using volumetric segmentation.

Results The OR to detect CE in anaplastic gliomas was seven times higher than that in diffuse gliomas (CI95% 2.817.2, p<0.0001). No CE was seen in 50% (8/16) of focal anaplastic and in 28% (10/36) of entirely anaplastic gliomas. CE was present in 21% (10/47) of diffuse gliomas. Anaplasia correlated with a larger CE volume (r=0.49, p<0.0001) and provided additional 4 cm 3 of CE volume compared to entirely diffuse tumors. The OR to have CE was 3.6 times for IDH1 wild-type tumors (CI95% 1.3–10.2, p=0.05) and 4.8 for tumors with ATRX expression (CI95% 1.3–17.2, p=0.05). In all sub-groups, at least a quarter of cases showed no CE at all and there were cases with present CE.

Conclusion CE is associated with higher odds of unfavorable prognostic features like anaplasia, wild-type IDH1 and retained ATRX. There was no CE in one-fourth of anaplastic gliomas and half of gliomas with focal anaplasia.

An externally validated deep learning model for the accurate segmentation of the lumbar paravertebral muscles

European Spine Journal (2022) 31:2156–2164

Imaging studies about the relevance of muscles in spinal disorders, and sarcopenia in general, require the segmentation of the muscles in the images which is very labour-intensive if performed manually and poses a practical limit to the number of investigated subjects. This study aimed at developing a deep learning-based tool able to fully automatically perform an accurate segmentation of the lumbar muscles in axial MRI scans, and at validating the new tool on an external dataset.

Methods A set of 60 axial MRI images of the lumbar spine was retrospectively collected from a clinical database. Psoas major, quadratus lumborum, erector spinae, and multifidus were manually segmented in all available slices. The dataset was used to train and validate a deep neural network able to segment muscles automatically. Subsequently, the network was externally validated on images purposely acquired from 22 healthy volunteers.

Results The median Jaccard index for the individual muscles calculated for the 22 subjects of the external validation set ranged between 0.862 and 0.935, demonstrating a generally excellent performance of the network, although occasional failures were noted. Cross-sectional area and fat fraction of the muscles were in agreement with published data.

Conclusions The externally validated deep neural network was able to perform the segmentation of the paravertebral muscles in an accurate and fully automated manner, although it is not without limitations. The model is therefore a suitable research tool to perform large-scale studies in the field of spinal disorders and sarcopenia, overcoming the limitations of non-automated methods.

Tractography-Based Surgical Targeting for Thalamic Deep Brain Stimulation: A Comparison of Probabilistic vs Deterministic Fiber Tracking of the Dentato-Rubro-Thalamic Tract

Neurosurgery 90:419–425, 2022

The ventral intermediate (VIM) thalamic nucleus is the main target for the surgical treatment of refractory tremor. Initial targeting traditionally relies on atlas-based stereotactic targeting formulas, which only minimally account for individual anatomy. Al- ternative approaches have been proposed, including direct targeting of the dentato-rubro- thalamic tract (DRTT), which, in clinical settings, is generally reconstructed with deterministic tracking. Whether more advanced probabilistic techniques are feasible on clinical-grade magnetic resonance acquisitions and lead to enhanced reconstructions is poorly understood.

OBJECTIVE: To compare DRTT reconstructed with deterministic vs probabilistic tracking. METHODS: Thisisaretrospectivestudyof19patientswithessentialtremorwhounderwentdeep brain stimulation (DBS) with intraoperative neurophysiology and stimulation testing. We assessed the proximity of the DRTT to the DBS lead and to the active contact chosen based on clinical response.

RESULTS: In the commissural plane, the deterministic DRTT was anterior (P<104)and  < 104) to the DBS lead. By contrast, although the probabilistic DRTT was also anterior to the lead (P < 104), there was no difference in the mediolateral dimension (P = .5). Moreover, the 3- dimensional Euclidean distance from the active contact to the probabilistic DRTT was smaller vs the distance to the deterministic DRTT (3.32 ± 1.70 mm vs 5.01 ± 2.12 mm; P < 104).

CONCLUSION: DRTT reconstructed with probabilistic fiber tracking was superior in spatial proximity to the physiology-guided DBS lead and to the empirically chosen active contact. These data inform strategies for surgical targeting of the VIM.

Correlation of anatomical involvement patterns of insular gliomas with subnetworks of the limbic system

J Neurosurg 136:323–334, 2022

Gliomas frequently involve the insula both primarily and secondarily by invasion. Despite the high connectivity of the human insula, gliomas do not spread randomly to or from the insula but follow stereotypical anatomical involvement patterns. In the majority of cases, these patterns correspond to the intrinsic connectivity of the limbic system, except for tumors with aggressive biology. On the basis of these observations, the authors hypothesized that these different involvement patterns may be correlated with distinct outcomes and analyzed these correlations in an institutional cohort.

METHODS Fifty-nine patients who had undergone surgery for insular diffuse gliomas and had complete demographic, pre- and postoperative imaging, pathology, molecular genetics, and clinical follow-up data were included in the analysis (median age 37 years, range 21–71 years, M/F ratio 1.68). Patients with gliomatosis and those with only minor involvement of the insula were excluded. The presence of T2-hyperintense tumor infiltration was evaluated in 12 anatomical structures. Hierarchical biclustering was used to identify co-involved structures, and the findings were correlated with established functional anatomy knowledge. Overall survival was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis (17 parameters).

RESULTS The tumors involved the anterior insula (98.3%), posterior insula (67.8%), temporal operculum (47.5%), amygdala (42.4%), frontal operculum (40.7%), temporal pole (39%), parolfactory area (35.6%), hypothalamus (23.7%), hippocampus (16.9%), thalamus (6.8%), striatum (5.1%), and cingulate gyrus (3.4%). A mean 4.2   2.6 structures were involved. On the basis of hierarchical biclustering, 7 involvement patterns were identified and correlated with cortical functional anatomy (pure insular [11.9%], olfactocentric [15.3%], olfactoopercular [33.9%], operculoinsular [15.3%], striatoinsular [3.4%], translimbic [11.9%], and multifocal [8.5%] patterns). Cox regression identified hippocampal involvement (p = 0.006) and postoperative tumor volume (p = 0.027) as significant negative independent prognosticators of overall survival and extent of resection (p = 0.015) as a significant positive independent prognosticator.

CONCLUSIONS The study findings indicate that insular gliomas primarily involve the olfactocentric limbic girdle and that involvement in the hippocampocentric limbic girdle is associated with a worse prognosis.

 

Tumor location and reduction in functional MRI estimates of language laterality

J Neurosurg 135:1674–1684, 2021

Brain tumors located close to the language cortex may distort functional MRI (fMRI)–based estimates of language dominance. The nature of this distortion, and whether this is an artifact of numerous confounders, remains unknown. The authors hypothesized tumor bias based on laterality estimates independent of confounders and that the effects are the greatest for tumors proximal to Broca’s area.

METHODS To answer this question, the authors reviewed more than 1113 patients who underwent preoperative fMRI to match samples on 11 known confounders (tumor location, size, type, and grade; seizure history; prior neurosurgery; aphasia presence and severity; and patient age, sex, and handedness). The samples included 30 patients with left hemisphere tumors (15 anterior and 15 posterior) and 30 with right hemisphere tumors (15 anterior and 15 posterior), thus totaling 60 patients (25 women; 18 left-handed and 4 ambidextrous; mean age 47 [SD 14.1] years). Importantly, the authors matched not only patients with left and right hemisphere tumors but also those with anterior and posterior tumors. Standard fMRI laterality indices (LIs) were calculated using whole-brain and region of interest (ROI) approaches (Broca’s and Wernicke’s areas).

RESULTS Tumors close to Broca’s area in the left hemisphere decreased LIs independently of known confounders. At the whole-brain level, this appeared to reflect a decrease in LI values in patients with left anterior tumors compared with patients with right anterior tumors. ROI analysis replicated these findings. Broca’s area LIs were significantly lower (p = 0.02) in patients with left anterior tumors (mean LI 0.28) when compared with patients with right anterior tumors (mean LI 0.70). Changes in Wernicke’s area–based LIs did not differ as a function of the tumor hemisphere. Therefore, in patients with left anterior tumors, it is essential to assess language laterality using left posterior ROIs. In all remaining tumor groups (left posterior tumors and right hemisphere tumors), language laterality derived from the anterior language ROI was the most robust measure of language dominance.

CONCLUSIONS Patients with tumors close to Broca’s area showed more bilateral fMRI language maps independent of known confounders. The authors caution against the assumption that this reduced language laterality suggests no or little risk to language function following tumor resection in the left inferior frontal gyrus. Their results address how to interpret fMRI data for neurosurgical purposes, along with theoretical questions of contralesional functional compensation and disinhibition.

 

MRI-guided stereotactic laser corpus callosotomy for epilepsy

J Neurosurg 135:770–782, 2021

Several small series have described stereotactic MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy for partial callosotomy of astatic and generalized tonic-clonic (GTC) seizures, especially in association with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Larger case series and comparison of distinct stereotactic methods for stereotactic laser corpus callosotomy (SLCC), however, are currently lacking. The objective of this study was to report seizure outcomes in a series of adult patients with epilepsy following anterior, posterior, and complete SLCC procedures and to compare the results achieved with a frameless stereotactic surgical robot versus direct MRI guidance frames.

METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed sequential adult epilepsy surgery patients who underwent SLCC procedures at a single institution. They describe workflows, stereotactic errors, percentage disconnection, hospitalization durations, adverse events, and seizure outcomes after performing anterior, posterior, and complete SLCC procedures using a frameless stereotactic surgical robot versus direct MRI guidance platforms.

RESULTS Thirteen patients underwent 15 SLCC procedures. The median age at surgery was 29 years (range 20–49 years), the median duration of epilepsy was 21 years (range 9–48 years), and median postablation follow-up was 20 months (range 4–44 months). Ten patients underwent anterior SLCC with a median 73% (range 33%–80%) midsagittal length of callosum acutely ablated. Following anterior SLCC, 6 of 10 patients achieved meaningful (> 50%) reduction of target seizures. Four patients underwent posterior (completion) SLCC following prior anterior callosotomy, and 1 patient underwent complete SLCC as a single procedure; 3 of these 5 patients experienced meaningful reduction of target seizures. Overall, 8 of 10 patients in whom astatic seizures were targeted and treated by anterior and/or posterior SLCC experienced meaningful improvement. SLCC procedures with direct MRI guidance (n = 7) versus a frameless surgical robot (n = 8) yielded median radial accuracies of 1.1 mm (range 0.2–2.0 mm) versus 2.4 mm (range 0.6–6.1 mm; p = 0.0011). The most serious adverse event was a clinically significant intraparenchymal hemorrhage in a patient who underwent the robotic technique.

CONCLUSIONS This is the largest reported series of SLCC for epilepsy to date. SLCC provides seizure outcomes comparable to open surgery outcomes reported in the literature. Direct MRI guidance is more accurate, which has the potential to reduce the risks of SLCC. Methodological advancements and larger studies are needed.