Awake craniotomy with transcortical motor evoked potential monitoring for resection of gliomas within or close to motor-related areas

J Neurosurg 136:1052–1061, 2022

The authors previously showed that combined evaluation of changes in intraoperative voluntary movement (IVM) during awake craniotomy and transcortical motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was useful for predicting postoperative motor function in 30 patients with precentral gyrus glioma. However, the validity of the previous report is limited to precentral gyrus gliomas. Therefore, the current study aimed to validate whether the combined findings of IVM during awake craniotomy and transcortical MEPs were useful for predicting postoperative motor function of patients with a glioma within or close to motor-related areas and not limited to the precentral gyrus.

METHODS The authors included 95 patients with gliomas within or close to motor-related areas who were treated between April 2000 and May 2020. All tumors were resected with IVM monitoring during awake craniotomy and transcortical MEP monitoring. Postoperative motor function was classified into four categories: “no change” or “declined,” the latter of which was further categorization as “mild,” “moderate,” or “severe.” The authors defined moderate and severe deficits as those that impact daily life.

RESULTS Motor function 6 months after surgery was classified as no change in 71 patients, mild in 18, moderate in 5, and severe in 1. Motor function at 6 months after surgery significantly correlated with IVM (p < 0.0001), transcortical MEPs (decline ≤ or > 50%) (p < 0.0001), age, preoperative motor dysfunction, extent of resection, and ischemic change on postoperative MRI. Thirty-two patients with no change in IVM showed no change in motor function at 6 months after surgery. Five of 34 patients (15%) with a decline in IVM and a decline in MEPs ≤ 50% had motor dysfunction with mild deficits 6 months after surgery. Furthermore, 19 of 23 patients (83%) with a decline in IVM and decline in MEPs > 50% had a decline in motor function, including 13 patients with mild, 5 with moderate, and 1 with severe deficits. Six patients with moderate or severe deficits had the lowest MEP values, at < 100 μV.

CONCLUSIONS This study validated the utility of combined application of IVM during awake craniotomy and transcortical MEP monitoring to predict motor function at 6 months after surgery in patients with a glioma within or close to motorrelated areas, not limited to the precentral gyrus. The authors also validated the usefulness of the cutoff value, 100 μV, in MEP monitoring.

Impact of awake mapping on overall survival and extent of resection in patients with adult diffuse gliomas within or near eloquent areas

Acta Neurochirurgica (2022) 164:395–404

Awake craniotomy (AC) with intraoperative mapping is the best approach to preserve neurological function for glioma surgery in eloquent or near eloquent areas, but whether AC improves the extent of resection (EOR) and overall survival (OS) is controversial. This study aimed to compare the long-term clinical outcomes of glioma resection under AC with those under general anesthesia (GA).

Methods Data of 335 patients who underwent surgery with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging for newly diagnosed gliomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grades II-IV between 2000 and 2013 were reviewed. EOR and OS were quantitatively compared between the AC and GA groups after 1:1 propensity score matching. The two groups were matched for age, preoperative Karnofsky performance status (KPS), tumor location, and pathology.

Results After propensity score matching, 91 pairs were obtained. The median EOR was 96.1% (interquartile range [IQR] 7.3) and 97.4% (IQR 14.4) in the AC and GA groups, respectively (p = 0.31). Median KPS score 3 months after surgery was 90 (IQR 20) in both groups (p = 0.384). The median survival times were 163.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 77.9–248.7) and 143.5 months (95% CI 94.4–192.7) in the AC and GA groups, respectively (p = 0.585).

Conclusion Even if the glioma was within or close to the eloquent area, AC was comparable with GA in terms of EOR and OS. In case of difficulties in randomizing patients with eloquent or near eloquent glioma, our propensity score-matched analysis provides retrospective evidence that AC can obtain EOR and OS equivalent to removing glioma under GA.

Asleep or awake motor mapping for resection of perirolandic glioma in the nondominant hemisphere?

J Neurosurg 136:16–29, 2022

Resection of glioma in the nondominant hemisphere involving the motor areas and pathways requires the use of brain-mapping techniques to spare essential sites subserving motor control. No clear indications are available for performing motor mapping under either awake or asleep conditions or for the best mapping paradigm (e.g., resting or active, high-frequency [HF] or low-frequency [LF] stimulation) that provides the best oncological and functional outcomes when tailored to the clinical context. This work aimed to identify clinical and imaging factors that influence surgical strategy (asleep motor mapping vs awake motor mapping) and that are associated with the best functional and oncological outcomes and to design a “motor mapping score” for guiding tumor resection in this area.

METHODS The authors evaluated a retrospective series of patients with nondominant-hemisphere glioma—located or infiltrating within 2 cm anteriorly or posteriorly to the central sulcus and affecting the primary motor cortex, its fibers, and/ or the praxis network—who underwent operations with asleep (HF monopolar probe) or awake (LF and HF probes) motor mapping. Clinical and imaging variables were used to design a motor mapping score. A prospective series of patients was used to validate this motor mapping score.

RESULTS One hundred thirty-five patients were retrospectively analyzed: 69 underwent operations with asleep (HF stimulation) motor mapping, and 66 underwent awake (LF and HF stimulation and praxis task evaluation) motor mapping. Previous motor (strength) deficit, previous treatment (surgery/radiotherapy), tumor volume > 30 cm3, and tumor involvement of the praxis network (on MRI) were identified and used to design the mapping score. Motor deficit, previous treatment, and location within or close to the central sulcus favor use of asleep motor mapping; large tumor volume and involvement of the praxis network favor use of awake motor mapping. The motor mapping score was validated in a prospective series of 52 patients—35 underwent operations with awake motor mapping and 17 with asleep motor mapping on the basis of the score indications—who had a low rate of postoperative motor-praxis deficit (3%) and a high extent of resection (median 97%; complete resection in > 70% of patients).

CONCLUSIONS Extensive resection of tumor involving the eloquent areas for motor control is feasible, and when an appropriate mapping strategy is applied, the incidence of postoperative motor-praxis deficit is low. Asleep (HF stimulation) motor mapping is preferable for lesions close to or involving the central sulcus and/or in patients with preoperative strength deficit and/or history of previous treatment. When a patient has no motor deficit or previous treatment and has a lesion (> 30 cm3) involving the praxis network, awake mapping is preferable.

Clinical Pearls and Methods for Intraoperative Awake Language Mapping

Neurosurgery 89:143–153, 2021

Intraoperative language mapping of tumor and peritumor tissue is a well-established technique for avoiding permanent neurological deficits and maximizing extent of resection.

Although there are several components of language that may be tested intraoperatively (eg, naming, writing, reading, and repetition), there is a lack of consistency in how patients are tested intraoperatively as well as the techniques involved to ensure safety during an awake procedure.

Here, we review appropriate patient selection, neuroanesthetic techniques, cortical and subcortical language mapping stimu- lation paradigms, and selection of intraoperative language tasks used during awake craniotomies.

We also expand on existing language mapping reviews by considering how intensity and timing of electrical stimulation may impact interpretation of mapping results.

Predicting the Extent of Resection in Low-Grade Glioma by Using Intratumoral Tractography to Detect Eloquent FasciclesWithin the Tumor

Neurosurgery 88(2) 2021: E190–E202

An early maximal safe surgical resection is the current treatment paradigm for low-grade glioma (LGG). Nevertheless, there are no reliable methods to accurately predict the axonal intratumoral eloquent areas and, consequently, to predict the extent of resection.

OBJECTIVE: To describe the functional predictive value of eloquent white matter tracts within the tumor by using a pre- and postoperative intratumoral diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography protocol in patients with LGG.

METHODS: A preoperative intratumoral DTI-based tractography protocol, using the tumor segmented volume as the only seed region, was used to assess the tracts within the tumor boundaries in 22 consecutive patients with LGG. The reconstructed tracts were correlated with intraoperative electrical stimulation (IES)-based language and motor subcortical mapping findings and the extent of resection was assessed by tumor volumetrics.

RESULTS: Identification of intratumoral language and motor tracts significantly predicted eloquent areas within the tumor during the IES mapping: the positive predictive value for the pyramidal tract, the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, the arcuate fasciculus and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus positive was 100%, 100%, 33%, and 80%, respectively, whereas negative predictive value was 100% for all of them. The reconstruction of at least one of these tracts within the tumor was significantly associated with a lower extent of resection (67%) as opposed to the extent of resection in the cases with a negative intratumoral tractography (100%) (P< .0001).

CONCLUSION: Intratumoral DTI-based tractography is a simple and reliable method, useful in assessing glioma resectability based on the analysis of intratumoral eloquent areas associated with motor and language tracts within the tumor.

Awake craniotomy with transcortical motor evoked potential monitoring for resection of gliomas in the precentral gyrus

J Neurosurg 132:987–997, 2020

Resection of gliomas in the precentral gyrus carries a risk of severe motor dysfunction. To prevent permanent, severe postoperative motor dysfunction, reliable intraoperative predictors of postoperative function are required. Since 2005, the authors have removed gliomas in the precentral gyrus with combined functional mapping and estimation of intraoperative voluntary movement (IVM) during awake craniotomy and transcortical motor evoked potentials (MEPs). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate whether intraoperative findings of combined monitoring of IVM during awake craniotomy and transcortical MEP monitoring were useful for predicting postoperative motor function of patients with gliomas in the precentral gyrus.

METHODS The current study included 30 patients who underwent resection of precentral gyrus gliomas during awake craniotomy from April 2000 to January 2018. All tumors were removed with monitoring of IVM during awake craniotomy and transcortical MEPs. Postoperative motor function was classified as stable or declined, with the extent of decline categorized as mild, moderate, or severe. We defined moderate and severe deficits were those that hindered daily life.

RESULTS In 28 of 30 cases, available waveforms were obtained with transcortical MEPs. The mean extent of resection (EOR) was 93%. Relative to preoperative status, motor function 6 months after surgery was considered stable in 20 patients and was considered to show mild decline in 7, moderate decline in 2, and severe decline in 1. Motor function 6 months after surgery was significantly correlated with IVM (p = 0.0096), changes in transcortical MEPs (decline ≤ or > 50%) (p = 0.0163), EOR, and ischemic lesions on postoperative MRI. Six patients with no change in IVM showed stable motor function 6 months after surgery. Only 2 patients with a decline in IVM and a decline in MEPs ≤ 50% had a decline in motor function 6 months after surgery (18%; 2/11 patients), whereas 11 patients with a decline in IVM and a decline in MEPs > 50% had such a decline in motor function (73%; 8/11 patients) including 2 patients with moderate and 1 with severe deficits. Three patients with moderate or severe motor deficits showed the lowest MEP values (< 100 μV).

CONCLUSIONS Combined judgment from monitoring of IVM during awake craniotomy and transcortical MEPs is useful for predicting postoperative motor function during removal of gliomas in the precentral gyrus. Maximum resection was achieved with an acceptable morbidity rate. Thus, these tumors should not be considered unresectable.

Comparison of Motor Outcome in Patients Undergoing Awake vs General Anesthesia Surgery for Brain Tumors Located Within or Adjacent to the Motor Pathways

Neurosurgery, Volume 85, Issue 3, September 2019: E470–E476

Surgical removal of intra-axial brain tumors aims at maximal tumor resection while preserving function. The potential benefit of awake craniotomy over craniotomy under general anesthesia (GA) for motor preservation is yet unknown.

OBJECTIVE: To compare the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent surgery for perirolandic tumors while either awake or under GA.

METHODS: Between 2004 and 2015, 1126 patients underwent surgical resection of newly diagnosed intra-axial tumors in a single institution. Data from 85 patients (44 awake, 41 GA) with full dataset who underwent resections for perirolandic tumors were retrospectively analyzed.

RESULTS: Identification of the motor cortex required significantly higher stimulation thresholds in anesthetized patients (9.1 ± 4 vs 6.2 ± 2.7 mA for awake patients, P = .0008). There was no group difference in the subcortical threshold for motor response used to assess the proximity of the lesion to the corticospinal (pyramidal) tract. High-grade gliomas were the most commonly treated pathology. The extent of resection and residual tumor volume were not different between groups. Postoperative motor deficits were more common in the anesthetized patients at 1 wk (P = .046), but no difference between the groups was detected at 3 mo. Patients in the GA group had a longer mean length of hospitalization (10.3 vs 6.7 d for the awake group, P = .003).

CONCLUSION: Awake craniotomy results in a better early postoperative motor outcome and shorter hospitalization compared with patients who underwent the same surgery under GA. The finding of higher cortical thresholds for the identification of the motor cortex in anesthetized patients may suggest an inhibitory effect of anesthetic agents on motor function.

Conscious sedation with dexmedetomidine compared with asleep-awake-asleep craniotomies in glioma surgery

J Neurosurg 129:1223–1230, 2018

Awake craniotomies have become a feasible tool over time to treat brain tumors located in eloquent regions. Different techniques have been applied in neurooncology centers. Both “asleep-awake-asleep” (asleep) and “conscious sedation” were used subsequently at the authors’ neurosurgical department. Since 2013, the authors have only performed conscious sedation surgeries, predominantly using the alfa2-receptor agonist dexmedetomidine as the anesthetic drug. The aim of this study was to compare both mentioned techniques and evaluate the clinical use of dexmedetomidine in the setting of awake craniotomies for glioma surgery.

METHODS The authors retrospectively analyzed patients who underwent operations either under the asleep condition using propofol-remifentanil or under conscious sedation conditions using dexmedetomidine infusions. In the asleep group patients were intubated with a laryngeal mask and extubated for the assessment period. Adverse events, as well as applied drugs with doses and frequency of usage, were recorded.

RESULTS From 224 awake surgeries between 2009 and 2015, 180 were performed for the resection of gliomas and included in the study. In the conscious sedation group (n = 75) significantly fewer opiates (p < 0.001) and vasoactive (p < 0.001) and antihypertensive (p < 0.001) drugs were used in comparison with the asleep group (n = 105). Furthermore, the postoperative length of stay (p < 0.001) and the surgical duration (p < 0.001) were significantly lower in the conscious sedation group.

CONCLUSIONS Use of dexmedetomidine creates excellent conditions for awake surgeries. It sedates moderately and acts as an anxiolytic. Thus, after ceasing infusion it enables quick and reliable clinical neurological assessment of patients. This might lead to reducing the amount of administered antihypertensive and vasoactive drugs as well as the length of hospitalization, while likely ensuring more rapid surgery.

 

Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation for glioma removal- prognostic value in motor function recovery from postsurgical neurological deficits

J Neurosurg 127:877–891, 2017

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) as a prognostic predictor for upper-extremity motor functional recovery from postsurgical neurological deficits.

METHODS Preoperative and postoperative nTMS studies were prospectively applied in 14 patients (mean age 39 ± 12 years) who had intraparenchymal brain neoplasms located within or adjacent to the motor eloquent area in the cerebral hemisphere. Mapping by nTMS was done 3 times, i.e., before surgery, and 1 week and 3 weeks after surgery. To assess the response induced by nTMS, motor evoked potential (nTMS-MEP) was recorded using a surface electromyography electrode attached to the abductor pollicis brevis (APB). The cortical locations that elicited the largest electromyography response by nTMS were defined as hotspots. Hotspots for APB were confirmed as positive responsive sites by direct electrical stimulation (DES) during awake craniotomy. The distances between hotspots and lesions (DHS-L) were measured. Postoperative neurological deficits were assessed by manual muscle test and dynamometer. To validate the prognostic value of nTMS in recovery from upper-extremity paresis, the following were investigated: 1) the correlation between DHS-L and the serial grip strength change, and 2) the correlation between positive nTMS-MEP at 1 week after surgery and the serial grip strength change.

RESULTS From the presurgical nTMS study, MEPs from targeted muscles were identified in 13 cases from affected hemispheres. In one case, MEP was not evoked due to a huge tumor. Among 9 cases from which intraoperative DES mapping for hand motor area was available, hotspots for APB identified by nTMS were concordant with DES-positive sites. Compared with the adjacent group (DHS-L < 10 mm, n = 6), the nonadjacent group (DHS-L ≥ 10 mm, n = 7) showed significantly better recovery of grip strength at 3 months after surgery (p < 0.01). There were correlations between DHS-L and recovery of grip strength at 1 week, 3 weeks, and 3 months after surgery (r = 0.74, 0.68, and 0.65, respectively). Postsurgical nTMS was accomplished in 13 patients. In 9 of 13 cases, nTMS-MEP from APB muscle was positive at 1 week after surgery. Excluding the case in which nTMS-MEP was negative from the presurgical nTMS study, recoveries in grip strength were compared between 2 groups, in which nTMS-MEP at 1 week after surgery was positive (n = 9) or negative (n = 3). Significant differences were observed between the 2 groups at 1 week, 3 weeks, and 3 months after surgery (p < 0.01). Positive nTMS-MEP at 1 week after surgery correlated well with the motor recovery at 1 week, 3 weeks, and 3 months after surgery (r = 0.87, 0.88, and 0.77, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS Navigated TMS is a useful tool for identifying motor eloquent areas. The results of the present study have demonstrated the predictive value of nTMS in upper-extremity motor function recovery from postsurgical neurological deficits. The longer DHS-L and positive nTMS-MEP at 1 week after surgery have prognostic values of better recovery from postsurgical neurological deficits.

 

Awake Craniotomy vs Craniotomy Under General Anesthesia for Perirolandic Gliomas

Neurosurgery 81:481–489, 2017

A craniotomy with direct cortical/subcortical stimulation either awake or under general anesthesia (GA) present 2 approaches for removing eloquent region tumors. With a reported higher prevalence of intraoperative seizures occurring during awake resections of perirolandic lesions, oftentimes, surgery under GA is chosen for these lesions.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a single-surgeon’s experience with awake craniotomies (AC) vs surgery under GA for resecting perirolandic, eloquent, motor-region gliomas.

METHODS: Between 2005 and 2015, a retrospective analysis of 27 patients with perirolandic, eloquent, motor-area gliomas that underwent an AC were case-control matched with 31 patients who underwent surgery under GA for gliomas in the same location. All patients underwent direct brain stimulation with neuromonitoring and perioperative risk factors, extent of resection, complications, and discharge status were assessed.

RESULTS: The postoperative Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) was significantly lower for theGApatients at 81.1 compared to theACpatients at 93.3 (P=.040). The extent of resection for GA patients was 79.6% while the AC patients had an 86.3% resection (P = .136). There were significantly more 100% total resections in the AC patients 25.9% compared to the GA group (6.5%; P=.041). Patients in theGAgroup had a longer mean length of hospitalization of 7.9 days compared to the AC group at 4.2 days (P = .049).

CONCLUSION: We show that AC can be performed with more frequent total resections, better postoperative KPS, shorter hospitalizations, as well as similar perioperative complication rates compared to surgery under GA for perirolandic, eloquent motor-region glioma.

The Cost of Brain Surgery: Awake vs Asleep Craniotomy for Perirolandic Region Tumors

Neurosurgery 81:307–314, 2017

Cost effectiveness has become an important factor in the health care system, requiring surgeons to improve efficacy of procedures while reducing costs. An awake craniotomy (AC) with direct cortical stimulation (DCS) presents one method to resect eloquent region tumors; however, some authors assert that this procedure is an expensive alternative to surgery under general anesthesia (GA) with neuromonitoring.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cost effectiveness and clinical outcomes between AC and GA patients.

METHODS: Retrospective analysis of a cohort of 17 patients with perirolandic gliomas who underwent an AC with DCS were case-control matched with 23 patients with perirolandic gliomas who underwent surgery under GA with neuromonitoring (ie, motor-evoked potentials, somatosensory-evoked potentials, phase reversal). Inpatient costs, qualityadjusted life years (QALY), extent of resection, and neurological outcome were compared between the groups.

RESULTS: Total inpatient expense per patient was $34 804 in the AC group and $46 798 in the GA group (P = .046). QALY score for the AC group was 0.97 and 0.47 for the GA group (P = .041). The incremental cost per QALY for the AC group was $82 720 less than the GA group. Postoperative Karnofsky performance status was 91.8 in the AC group and 81.3 in the GA group (P=.047). Length of hospitalization was 4.12 days in the AC group and 7.61 days in the GA group (P = .049).

CONCLUSION: The total inpatient costs for awake craniotomies were lower than surgery under GA. This study suggests better cost effectiveness and neurological outcome with awake craniotomies for perirolandic gliomas.

Passive language mapping combining real-time oscillation analysis with cortico-cortical evoked potentials for awake craniotomy

J Neurosurg 125:1580–1588, 2016

Electrocortical stimulation (ECS) is the gold standard for functional brain mapping; however, precise functional mapping is still difficult in patients with language deficits. High gamma activity (HGA) between 80 and 140 Hz on electrocorticography is assumed to reflect localized cortical processing, whereas the cortico-cortical evoked potential (CCEP) can reflect bidirectional responses evoked by monophasic pulse stimuli to the language cortices when there is no patient cooperation. The authors propose the use of “passive” mapping by combining HGA mapping and CCEP recording without active tasks during conscious resections of brain tumors.

Methods Five patients, each with an intraaxial tumor in their dominant hemisphere, underwent conscious resection of their lesion with passive mapping. The authors performed functional localization for the receptive language area, using real-time HGA mapping, by listening passively to linguistic sounds. Furthermore, single electrical pulses were delivered to the identified receptive temporal language area to detect CCEPs in the frontal lobe. All mapping results were validated by ECS, and the sensitivity and specificity were evaluated.

Results Linguistic HGA mapping quickly identified the language area in the temporal lobe. Electrical stimulation by linguistic HGA mapping to the identified temporal receptive language area evoked CCEPs on the frontal lobe. The combination of linguistic HGA and frontal CCEPs needed no patient cooperation or effort. In this small case series, the sensitivity and specificity were 93.8% and 89%, respectively.

Conclusions The described technique allows for simple and quick functional brain mapping with higher sensitivity and specificity than ECS mapping. The authors believe that this could improve the reliability of functional brain mapping and facilitate rational and objective operations. Passive mapping also sheds light on the underlying physiological mechanisms of language in the human brain.

Maximizing safe resection of low- and high-grade glioma

dti-gliomas

J Neurooncol (2016) 130:269–282

Surgical resection plays a central role in the management of gliomas. In this study, we review the evidence in support of extent of resection to improve survival, symptom management, and time to malignant transformation in low- and high-grade gliomas, and summarize the findings from our literature search regarding the role of extent of resection and intraoperative practices to maximize safety.

There is a growing body of evidence supporting improved overall survival, improved progression-free survival, and superior quality of life with greater extent of resection.

Additionally, a better understanding of central nervous system plasticity allows for a staged approach to the surgical management of low- and intermediate-grade gliomas.

A number of intraoperative techniques have been utilized to offer safer glioma surgery with greater extent of resection. Approaches such as awake brain tumor surgery can be safely performed with low failure rates and excellent long-term functional outcomes.

Identification of language area and the pars triangularis

language-area-and-pt

Journal of Neurosurgery Vol. 125 / No. 4 : 803-811

Identification of language areas using functional brain mapping is sometimes impossible using current methods but essential to preserve language function in patients with gliomas located within or near the frontal language area (FLA). However, the factors that influence the failure to detect language areas have not been elucidated. The present study evaluated the difficulty in identifying the FLA in dominant-side frontal gliomas that involve the pars triangularis (PT) to determine the factors that influenced failed positive language mapping.

Methods: Awake craniotomy was performed on 301 patients from April 2000 to October 2013 at Tokyo Women’s Medical University. Recurrent cases were excluded, and patients were also excluded if motor mapping indicated their glioma was in or around the motor area on the dominant or nondominant side. Eighty-two consecutive cases of primary frontal glioma on the dominant side were analyzed for the present study. MRI was used for all patients to evaluate whether tumors involved the PT and to perform language functional mapping with a bipolar electrical stimulator. Eighteen of 82 patients (mean age 39 ± 13 years) had tumors that showed involvement of the PT, and the detailed characteristics of these 18 patients were examined.

Results: The FLA could not be identified with intraoperative brain mapping in 14 (17%) of 82 patients; 11 (79%) of these 14 patients had a tumor involving the PT. The negative response rate in language mapping was only 5% in patients without involvement of the PT, whereas this rate was 61% in patients with involvement of the PT. Univariate analyses showed no significant correlation between identification of the FLA and sex, age, histology, or WHO grade. However, failure to identify the FLA was significantly correlated with involvement of the PT (p < 0.0001). Similarly, multivariate analyses with the logistic regression model showed that only involvement of the PT was significantly correlated with failure to identify the FLA (p < 0.0001). In 18 patients whose tumors involved the PT, only 1 patient had mild preoperative dysphasia. One week after surgery, language function worsened in 4 (22%) of 18 patients. Six months after surgery, 1 (5.6%) of 18 patients had a persistent mild speech deficit. The mean extent of resection was 90% ± 7.1%.

Conclusions: Identification of the FLA can be difficult in patients with frontal gliomas on the dominant side that involve the PT, but the positive mapping rate of the FLA was 95% in patients without involvement of the PT. These findings are useful for establishing a positive mapping strategy for patients undergoing awake craniotomy for the treatment of frontal gliomas on the dominant side. Thoroughly positive language mapping with subcortical electrical stimulation should be performed in patients without involvement of the PT. More careful continuous neurological monitoring combined with subcortical electrical stimulation is needed when removing dominant-side frontal gliomas that involve the PT.

Identification of language area and the pars triangularis

language-area-and-pt

J Neurosurg 125:803–811, 2016

Identification of language areas using functional brain mapping is sometimes impossible using current methods but essential to preserve language function in patients with gliomas located within or near the frontal language area (FLA). However, the factors that influence the failure to detect language areas have not been elucidated. The present study evaluated the difficulty in identifying the FLA in dominant-side frontal gliomas that involve the pars triangularis (PT) to determine the factors that influenced failed positive language mapping.

Methods: Awake craniotomy was performed on 301 patients from April 2000 to October 2013 at Tokyo Women’s Medical University. Recurrent cases were excluded, and patients were also excluded if motor mapping indicated their glioma was in or around the motor area on the dominant or nondominant side. Eighty-two consecutive cases of primary frontal glioma on the dominant side were analyzed for the present study. MRI was used for all patients to evaluate whether tumors involved the PT and to perform language functional mapping with a bipolar electrical stimulator. Eighteen of 82 patients (mean age 39 ± 13 years) had tumors that showed involvement of the PT, and the detailed characteristics of these 18 patients were examined.

Results: The FLA could not be identified with intraoperative brain mapping in 14 (17%) of 82 patients; 11 (79%) of these 14 patients had a tumor involving the PT. The negative response rate in language mapping was only 5% in patients without involvement of the PT, whereas this rate was 61% in patients with involvement of the PT. Univariate analyses showed no significant correlation between identification of the FLA and sex, age, histology, or WHO grade. However, failure to identify the FLA was significantly correlated with involvement of the PT (p < 0.0001). Similarly, multivariate analyses with the logistic regression model showed that only involvement of the PT was significantly correlated with failure to identify the FLA (p < 0.0001). In 18 patients whose tumors involved the PT, only 1 patient had mild preoperative dysphasia. One week after surgery, language function worsened in 4 (22%) of 18 patients. Six months after surgery, 1 (5.6%) of 18 patients had a persistent mild speech deficit. The mean extent of resection was 90% ± 7.1%.

Conclusions: Identification of the FLA can be difficult in patients with frontal gliomas on the dominant side that involve the PT, but the positive mapping rate of the FLA was 95% in patients without involvement of the PT. These findings are useful for establishing a positive mapping strategy for patients undergoing awake craniotomy for the treatment of frontal gliomas on the dominant side. Thoroughly positive language mapping with subcortical electrical stimulation should be performed in patients without involvement of the PT. More careful continuous neurological monitoring combined with subcortical electrical stimulation is needed when removing dominant-side frontal gliomas that involve the PT.

Hypnosis for Awake Surgery of Low-grade Gliomas

Hypnosis for Awake Surgery of Low-grade Gliomas

Neurosurgery 78:53–61, 2016

Awake craniotomy with intraoperative electric stimulation is a reliable method for extensive removal of low-grade gliomas while preserving the functional integrity of eloquent surrounding brain structures. Although fully awake procedures have been proposed, asleep-awake-asleep remains the standard technique. Anesthetic contraindications are the only limitation of this method, which is therefore not reliable for older patients with high-grade gliomas.

OBJECTIVE: To describe and assess a novel method for awake craniotomy based on hypnosis.

METHODS: We proposed a novel hypnosedation procedure to patients undergoing awake surgery for low-grade gliomas in our institution between May 2011 and April 2015. Surgical data were retrospectively recorded. The subjective experience of hypnosis was assessed by 3 standardized questionnaires: the Cohen Perceived Stress Scale, the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist Scale, the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experience Questionnaire, and a fourth questionnaire designed specifically for this study.

RESULTS: Twenty-eight questionnaires were retrieved from 43 procedures performed on 37 patients. The Peritraumatic Dissociative Experience Questionnaire revealed a dissociation state in 17 cases. The Perceived Stress Scale was pathological in 8 patients. Two patients in this group stated that they would not accept a second hypnosedation procedure. The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist Scale revealed 1 case of posttraumatic stress disorder. Burr hole and bone flap procedures were the most frequently reported unpleasant events during opening (15 of 52 events).

CONCLUSION: The main findings of our study are the effectiveness of the technique, which in all cases allowed resection of the tumor up to functional boundaries, and the positive psychological impact of the technique in most of the patients.

Awake craniotomy to maximize glioma resection: methods and technical nuances over a 27-year period

awake craniotomy

J Neurosurg 123:325–339, 2015

Awake craniotomy is currently a useful surgical approach to help identify and preserve functional areas during cortical and subcortical tumor resections. Methodologies have evolved over time to maximize patient safety and minimize morbidity using this technique. The goal of this study is to analyze a single surgeon’s experience and the evolving methodology of awake language and sensorimotor mapping for glioma surgery.

Methods The authors retrospectively studied patients undergoing awake brain tumor surgery between 1986 and 2014. Operations for the initial 248 patients (1986–1997) were completed at the University of Washington, and the subsequent surgeries in 611 patients (1997–2014) were completed at the University of California, San Francisco. Perioperative risk factors and complications were assessed using the latter 611 cases.

Results The median patient age was 42 years (range 13–84 years). Sixty percent of patients had Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) scores of 90–100, and 40% had KPS scores less than 80. Fifty-five percent of patients underwent surgery for high-grade gliomas, 42% for low-grade gliomas, 1% for metastatic lesions, and 2% for other lesions (cortical dysplasia, encephalitis, necrosis, abscess, and hemangioma). The majority of patients were in American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class 1 or 2 (mild systemic disease); however, patients with severe systemic disease were not excluded from awake brain tumor surgery and represented 15% of study participants. Laryngeal mask airway was used in 8 patients (1%) and was most commonly used for large vascular tumors with more than 2 cm of mass effect. The most common sedation regimen was propofol plus remifentanil (54%); however, 42% of patients required an adjustment to the initial sedation regimen before skin incision due to patient intolerance. Mannitol was used in 54% of cases. Twelve percent of patients were active smokers at the time of surgery, which did not impact completion of the intraoperative mapping procedure. Stimulation-induced seizures occurred in 3% of patients and were rapidly terminated with ice-cold Ringer’s solution. Preoperative seizure history and tumor location were associated with an increased incidence of stimulation- induced seizures. Mapping was aborted in 3 cases (0.5%) due to intraoperative seizures (2 cases) and patient emotional intolerance (1 case). The overall perioperative complication rate was 10%.

Conclusions Based on the current best practice described here and developed from multiple regimens used over a 27-year period, it is concluded that awake brain tumor surgery can be safely performed with extremely low complication and failure rates regardless of ASA classification; body mass index; smoking status; psychiatric or emotional history; seizure frequency and duration; and tumor site, size, and pathology.

Awake craniotomy in intraoperative MRI

Awake craniotomy for gliomas in a high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging suite

J Neurosurg 121:810–817, 2014

The object of this study was to describe the experience of combining awake craniotomy techniques with high-field (1.5 T) intraoperative MRI (iMRI) for tumors adjacent to eloquent cortex.

Methods. From a prospective database the authors obtained and evaluated the records of all patients who had undergone awake craniotomy procedures with cortical and subcortical mapping in the iMRI suite. The integration of these two modalities was assessed with respect to safety, operative times, workflow, extent of resection (EOR), and neurological outcome.

Results. Between February 2010 and December 2011, 42 awake craniotomy procedures using iMRI were performed in 41 patients for the removal of intraaxial tumors. There were 31 left-sided and 11 right-sided tumors. In half of the cases (21 [50%] of 42), the patient was kept awake for both motor and speech mapping. The mean duration of surgery overall was 7.3 hours (range 4.0–13.9 hours). The median EOR overall was 90%, and gross-total resection (EOR ≥ 95%) was achieved in 17 cases (40.5%). After viewing the first MR images after initial resection, further resection was performed in 17 cases (40.5%); the mean EOR in these cases increased from 56% to 67% after further resection. No deficits were observed preoperatively in 33 cases (78.5%), and worsening neurological deficits were noted immediately after surgery in 11 cases (26.2%). At 1 month after surgery, however, worsened neurological function was observed in only 1 case (2.3%).

Conclusions. There was a learning curve with regard to patient positioning and setup times, although it did not adversely affect patient outcomes. Awake craniotomy can be safely performed in a high-field (1.5 T) iMRI suite to maximize tumor resection in eloquent brain areas with an acceptable morbidity profile at 1 month.

Patient response to awake craniotomy

awake craniotomy

Acta Neurochir (2014) 156:1063–1070

Awake craniotomy is a valuable procedure since it allows brain mapping and live monitoring of eloquent brain functions. The advantage of minimizing resource utilization is also emphasized by some physicians in North America. Data on how well an awake craniotomy is tolerated by patients and how much stress it creates is available from different studies, but this topic has not consequently been summarized in a review of the available literature. Therefore, it is the purpose of this review to shed more light on the still controversially discussed aspect of an awake craniotomy.

Methods We reviewed the available English literature published until December 2013 searching for studies that investigated patients’ responses to awake craniotomies.

Results Twelve studies, published between 1998 and 2013, including 396 patients with awake surgery were identified. Eleven of these 12 studies set the focus on the perioperative time, one study focused on the later postoperative time. The vast majority of patients felt well prepared and overall satisfaction with the procedure was high. In the majority of studies up to 30 % of the patients recalled considerable pain and 10– 14 % experienced strong anxiety during the procedure. The majority of patients reported that they would undergo an awake craniotomy again. A post traumatic stress disorder was present neither shortly nor years after surgery. However, a normal human response to such an exceptional situation can for instance be the delayed appearance of unintentional distressing recollections of the event despite the patients’ satisfaction concerning the procedure.

Conclusions For selected patients, an awake craniotomy presents the best possible way to reduce the risk of surgery related neurological deficits. However, benefits and burdens of this type of procedure should be carefully considered when planning an awake craniotomy and the decision should serve the interests of the patient.

Failed awake craniotomy: a retrospective analysis in 424 patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumor

Awake cranio

J Neurosurg 118:243–249, 2013

Awake craniotomy for removal of intraaxial tumors within or adjacent to eloquent brain regions is a well-established procedure. However, awake craniotomy failures have not been well characterized. In the present study, the authors aimed to analyze and assess the incidence and causes for failed awake craniotomy.

Methods. The database of awake craniotomies performed at Tel Aviv Medical Center between 2003 and 2010 was reviewed. Awake craniotomy was considered a failure if conversion to general anesthesia was required, or if adequate mapping or monitoring could not have been achieved.

Results. Of 488 patients undergoing awake craniotomy, 424 were identified as having complete medical, operative, and anesthesiology records. The awake craniotomies performed in 27 (6.4%) of these 424 patients were considered failures. The main causes of failure were lack of intraoperative communication with the patient (n = 18 [4.2%]) and/or intraoperative seizures (n = 9 [2.1%]). Preoperative mixed dysphasia (p < 0.001) and treatment with phenytoin (p = 0.0019) were related to failure due to lack of communication. History of seizures (p = 0.03) and treatment with multiple antiepileptic drugs (p = 0.0012) were found to be related to failure due to intraoperative seizures. Compared with the successful awake craniotomy group, a significantly lower rate of gross-total resection was achieved (83% vs 54%, p = 0.008), there was a higher incidence of short-term speech deterioration postoperatively (6.1% vs 23.5%, p = 0.0017) as well as at 3 months postoperatively (2.3% vs 15.4%, p = 0.0002), and the hospitalization period was longer (4.9 ± 6.2 days vs 8.0 ± 10.1 days, p < 0.001). Significantly more major complications occurred in the failure group (4 [14.8%] of 27) than in the successful group (16 [4%] of 397) (p = 0.037).

Conclusions. Failures of awake craniotomy were associated with a lower incidence of gross-total resection and increased postoperative morbidity. The majority of awake craniotomy failures were preventable by adequate patient selection and avoiding side effects of drugs administered during surgery.