Shunting of the over 80s in normal pressure hydrocephalus

Acta Neurochir (2017) 159:987–994

Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus is predominantly a disease of the elderly. By its nature, many of those who present to clinic are in advanced old age with multiple comorbidities. Majority of patients treated are younger than 80 years old. We present the clinical outcomes and complication rates of patients over the age of 80 years at the time of operation, during the past 11 years at a single institution.

Methods Retrospective analysis of clinical records of all patients over the age of 80 years, who presented to our institution between 2006 and 2016.

Results were analysed for co-morbidities, immediate and delayed complications, change in mobility/cognitive function post shunting of hydrocephalus.

Results 39 patients (24 male, 15 female) met criteria. Mean [SD] age at the time of shunt insertion was 84 years (+/− 3.22) (range 80–94). No patients developed immediate CSF infection or sub-dural collection, or extended length of stay due to surgical or anaesthetic complications. There were no perioperative or anaesthetic complications. 4 patients required a delayed surgical revision to encourage greater CSF drainage. 3 patients went on to develop delayed subdural haematoma, 1 of which was associated with trauma, 2 through overdrainage. 1 patient experienced poor post-operative wound healing and subsequently underwent removal of shunt. Of the 34 patient followed up, 27 patients (79.4%) improved in their mobility. (64.7%) patients/families reported symptomatic improvement in their cognition and memory. 6 (17.7%) patients did not experience an improvement in either mobility or cognitive function.

Conclusions Our data supports the assertion that, with proper patient selection, shunting of the over 80s with iNPH is a safe and effective procedure.