Radiological Differentiation Between Intracranial Meningioma and Solitary Fibrous Tumor/Hemangiopericytoma

World Neurosurg. (2023) 170:68-83

Intracranial solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is characterized by aggressive local behavior and high post-resection recurrence rates. It is difficult to distinguish between SFT and meningiomas, which are typically benign. The goal of this study was to systematically review radiological features that differentiate meningioma and SFT.

METHODS: We performed a systematic review in accordance with PRISMA guidelines to identify studies that used imaging techniques to identify radiological differentiators of SFT and meningioma.

RESULTS: Eighteen studies with 1565 patients (SFT: 662; meningiomas: 903) were included. The most commonly used imaging modality was diffusion weighted imaging, which was reported in 11 studies. Eight studies used a combination of diffusion weighted imaging and T1- and T2-weighted sequences to distinguish between SFT and meningioma. Compared to all grades/subtypes of meningioma, SFT is associated with higher apparent diffusion coefficient, presence of narrow-based dural attachments, lack of dural tail, less peritumoral brain edema, extensive serpentine flow voids, and younger age at initial diagnosis. Tumor volume was a poor differentiator of SFT and meningioma, and overall, there were less consensus findings in studies exclusively comparing angiomatous meningiomas and SFT.

CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians can differentiate SFT from meningiomas on preoperative imaging by looking for higher apparent diffusion coefficient, lack of dural tail/narrow-based dural attachment, less peritumoral brain edema, and vascular flow voids on neuroimaging, in addition to younger age at diagnosis. Distinguishing between angiomatous meningioma and SFT is much more challenging, as both are highly vascular pathologies. Tumor volume has limited utility in differentiating between SFT and various grades/subtypes of meningioma.