Clinical and prognostic features of venous hypertensive myelopathy from craniocervical arteriovenous fistulas

J Neurosurg 139:687–697, 2023

Current knowledge about venous hypertensive myelopathy (VHM) is incomplete. This study was performed with the aim of clarifying the clinical features and outcomes of craniocervical VHM.

METHODS This retrospective, single-center cohort study included 65 patients with craniocervical junction arteriovenous fistulas resulting in VHM treated in Xuanwu Hospital from January 1, 2002, to December 30, 2020. All patients underwent microsurgery or endovascular treatment. The primary outcome was neurological function assessment using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale, modified Aminoff-Logue Scale (mALS), and Venous Hypertensive Myelopathy Scale (VHMS). The secondary outcomes were recurrences and postoperative adverse events. Pearson linear regression and receiver operating characteristic curves were used to evaluate the relationships among the three scales. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to predict outcomes.

RESULTS The mean patient age was 57.4 ± 11.4 years, and 88% of patients were male. The 1-year follow-up rate was 83.1%, and the 5-year follow-up rate was 50.8%. The VHMS was correlated with the JOA (R 2 = 0.6722) and mALS (R 2 = 0.7399) and increased the assessment accuracy by approximately 20% when compared with the other two scales. Overall, 25.9% of patients experienced delayed neurological decline beyond the 1-year follow-up. Further logistic regression suggested that age > 65 years was an independent predictor (OR 7.831, 95% CI 1.090–56.266; p = 0.041). Embolic recanalization and new bilateral symmetry feeders were the major reasons for recurrence. Recurrence increased the risk of adverse events after the second surgery (OR 20.455, 95% CI 1.170–357.320; p = 0.039).

CONCLUSIONS CCJ AVFs resulting in VHM are a rare but deadly complication, and providers should be cautious of age-related delayed neurological decline and strive for a one-time anatomical cure.

Topographical Risk Factor Analysis of New Neurological Deficits Following Precentral Gyrus Resection

Topographical Risk Factor Analysis of New Neurological Deficits Following Precentral Gyrus Resection

Neurosurgery 76:714–720, 2015

Precentral gyrus resections (PGRs) have been regarded as excessively hazardous interventions because of the risk of postoperative major neurological complications.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the neurological deterioration that follows PGRs and to assess the topographical risk factors associated with these morbidities.

METHODS: We reviewed 33 consecutive patients who experienced pharmacologically intractable epilepsy and underwent PGR with intraoperative cortical stimulation and mapping while under awake anesthesia. The etiological diagnoses were brain neoplasm in 26 patients (78.8%), cortical lesion in 4 (12.1%), and no lesion in 3 (9.1%). The mean follow-up period was 62.6 months (range, 12-146 months). All topographical analyses of the resected quadrant area were performed based on postoperative magnetic resonance images.

RESULTS: After PGR, 22 patients (66.7%) experienced neurological worsening, including 5 permanent deficits (15.2%) and 17 transient deficits (51.5%). Permanent deficits included 2 instances of weakness, 1 dysarthria, 1 dysesthesia, and 1 fine-movement disturbance of the hand. While the neurological risk for anterior lower quadrant PGR was 20.0% (1/5), the risk for posterior upper quadrant PGR was 100.0% (10/10). The anterior upper and posterior lower quadrant PGR caused neurological deteriorations in 60.0% (6/10) and 62.5% (5/8) of the patients, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, PGR of the posterior and upper quadrant sections were significant risk factors for post-PGR neurological deteriorations (P = .022 and 0.030, respectively).

CONCLUSION: The posterior upper quadrant of the precentral gyrus was vulnerable to post-resective neurological impairment.