Essentials in intraoperative indocyanine green videoangiography assessment for intracranial aneurysm surgery

ICG aneurysm

Neurosurg Focus 36 (2):E7, 2014

Indocyanine green (ICG) videoangiography (VA) in cerebral aneurysm surgery allows confirmation of blood flow in parent, branching, and perforating vessels as well as assessment of remnant aneurysm parts after clip application. A retrospective analysis and review of the literature were conducted to determine the current essential advantages of ICG-VA in aneurysm surgery.

Methods. The authors retrospectively evaluated all aneurysm cases treated with the aid of intraoperative ICG-VA at a single institution between 2007 and 2013. They also analyzed the literature published since the initial description of ICG-VA in 2003.

Results. Two hundred forty-six procedures were performed in 232 patients harboring 295 aneurysms. The pa- tients, whose mean age was 54 years, consisted of 159 women and 73 men. One hundred twenty-four surgeries were performed after subarachnoid hemorrhage, and 122 were performed for incidental aneurysms. Single aneurysms were clipped in 185 patients, and multiple aneurysms were clipped in 47 (mean aneurysm diameter 6.9 mm, range 2–40 mm). No complications associated with ICG-VA occurred. Intraoperative microvascular Doppler ultrasonography was performed before ICG-VA in all patients, and postoperative digital subtraction angiography (DSA) studies were available in 121 patients (52.2%) for retrospective comparative analysis. In 22 (9%) of 246 procedures, the clip posi- tion was modified intraoperatively as a consequence of ICG-VA. Stenosis of the parent vessels (16 procedures) or occlusion of the perforators (6 procedures), not detected by micro-Doppler ultrasonography, were the most common problems demonstrated on ICG-VA. In another 11 procedures (4.5%), residual perfusion of the aneurysm was ob- served and one or more additional clips were applied. Vessel stenosis or a compromised perforating artery occurred independent of aneurysm location and was about equally common in middle cerebral artery and anterior communi- cating artery aneurysms. In 2 procedures (0.8%), aneurysm puncture revealed residual blood flow within the lesion, which had not been detected by the ICG-VA. In the postoperative DSA studies, unexpected small (< 2 mm) aneurysm neck remnants, which had not been detected on intraoperative ICG-VA, were found in 11 (9.1%) of 121 patients. However, these remnants remained without consequence except in 1 patient with a 6-mm residual aneurysm dome, which was subsequently embolized with coils.

Conclusions. In a large cohort of consecutive patients, ICG-VA proved to be a helpful intraoperative tool and led to a significant intraoperative clip modification rate of 15%. However, small, < 2-mm-wide neck remnants and a 6-mm residual aneurysm were missed by intraoperative ICG-VA in up to 10% of patients. Results in this study confirm that DSA is indispensable for postoperative quality assessment in complex aneurysm surgery.

Bypass surgery for complex middle cerebral artery aneurysms

By-pass surgery in MCAA

J Neurosurg 120:398–408, 2014

The object of this study was to describe the authors’ institutional experience in the treatment of complex middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms necessitating bypass and vessel sacrifice.

Methods. Cases in which patients with MCA aneurysms were treated with a combination of bypass and parent artery sacrifice were reviewed retrospectively.

Results. The authors identified 24 patients (mean age 46 years) who were treated with bypass and parent artery sacrifice. The aneurysms were located in the M1 segment in 7 patients, MCA bifurcation in 8, and more distally in 9. The mean aneurysm diameter was 30 mm (range 7–60 mm, median 26 mm). There were 8 saccular and 16 fusiform aneurysms. Twenty-one extracranial-intracranial and 4 intracranial-intracranial bypasses were performed. Partial or total trapping (only) of the parent artery was performed in 17 cases, trapping with resection of aneurysm in 3, and aneurysm clipping with sacrifice of an M2 branch in 4. The mean follow-up period was 27 months. The aneurysm obliteration rate was 100%. No recanalization of the aneurysms was detected during follow-up. There was 1 perioperative death (4% mortality rate) and 6 cerebrovascular accidents, causing permanent morbidity in 5 patients. The median modified Rankin Scale score of patients with an M1 aneurysm increased from 0 preoperatively to 2 at latest follow-up, while the score was unchanged in other patients. Most of the permanent deficits were associated with M1 aneurysms. Twenty-one patients (88%) had good outcome as defined by a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 4 or 5.

Conclusions. Bypass in combination with parent vessel occlusion is a useful technique with acceptable frequencies of morbidity and mortality for complex MCA aneurysms when conventional surgical or endovascular techniques are not feasible. The location of the aneurysm should be considered when planning the type of bypass and the site of vessel occlusion. Flow alteration by partial trapping may be preferable to total trapping for the M1 aneurysms.