Long-Term Outcomes of Bilateral Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation for Patients With Parkinson’s Disease: 10 Years and Beyond

Neurosurgery 91:726–733, 2022

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) represents an effective treatment for severe Parkinson’s disease (PD), but little is known about the long-term benefit.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the survival rate and long-term outcome of DBS.

METHODS: We investigated all 81 patients including 37 males and 44 females who underwent bilateral STN DBS from March 2005 to March 2008 at a single institution. The current survival status of the patients was investigated. Preoperative and postoperative follow-up assessments were analyzed.

RESULTS: The mean age at the time of surgery was 62 (range 27-82) years, and the median clinical follow-up duration was 145 months. Thirty-five patients (43%) died during the follow-up period. The mean duration from DBS surgery to death was 110.46 ± 40.8 (range 0-155) months. The cumulative survival rate is as follows: 98.8 ± 1.2% (1 year), 95.1 ± 2.4% (5 years), and 79.0 ± 4.5% (10 years). Of the 81 patients, 33 (40%) were ambulatory up to more than 11 years. The Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) score was significantly improved until 5 years after surgery although it showed a tendency to increase again after 10 years. The patient group with both electrodes located within the STN showed a higher rate of survival and maintained ambulation.

CONCLUSION: STN DBS is a safe and effective treatment for patients with advanced PD. This study based on the long-term follow-up of large patient populations can be used to elucidate the long-term fate of patients who underwent bilateral STN DBS for PD.