Technical Assessment of Microvascular Decompression for Trigeminal Neuralgia Using a 3-Dimensional Exoscope

Operative Neurosurgery 23:374–381, 2022

Detailed anatomic visualization of the root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve is crucial to successfully perform microvascular decompression surgery (MVD) in patients with trigeminal neuralgia.

OBJECTIVE: To determine advantages and disadvantages using a 3-dimensional (3D) exoscope for MVD surgery.

METHODS: A 4K 3D exoscope (ORBEYE) was used by a single surgical team for MVD in a retrospective case series of 8 patients with trigeminal neuralgia in a tertiary center. Clinical and surgical data were collected, and advantages/disadvantages of using the exoscope for MVD were recorded after each surgery. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data.

RESULTS: Adequate MVD of the trigeminal nerve root was possible in all patients by exclusively using the exoscope. It offered bright visualization of the cerebellopontine angle and the root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve that was comparable with a binocular operating microscope. The greatest advantages of the exoscope included good optical quality, the pronounced depth of field of the image for all observers, and its superior surgeon ergonomics. Disadvantages were revealed with overexposure at deep surgical sites and the lack of endoscope integration. In 6 patients, facial pain improved significantly after surgery (Barrow Neurological Institute pain intensity score I in 5 and III in 1 patient), whereas it did not in 2 patients (Barrow Neurological Institute score IV and V). No complications occurred.

CONCLUSION: Utilization of a 3D exoscope for MVD is a safe and feasible procedure. Surgeons benefit from better ergonomics, excellent image quality, and an improved experience for observers.

Parietal trans‑sulcal para‑fascicular approach to lateral thalamic/internal capsule cavernous malformation

Acta Neurochirurgica (2021) 163:2497–2501

The surgical management of deep brain lesions is challenging, with significant morbidity. Advances in surgical technology have presented the opportunity to tackle these lesions.

Methods We performed a complete resection of a thalamic/internal capsule CM using a tubular retractor system via a parietal trans-sulcal para-fascicular (PTPF) approach without collateral injury to the nearby white matter tracts.

Conclusion PTPF approach to lateral thalamic/internal capsule lesions can be safely performed without injury to eloquent white matter fibres. The paucity of major vessels along this trajectory and the preservation of lateral ventricle integrity make this approach a feasible alternative to traditional approaches.